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Posts Tagged ‘pattern design’

Marimekko_Holiday 2014_Lamppupampula Pattern_Sanna Annukka_3

Today I’m sharing my last in a series of favorite Holiday brands from 2014. Earlier I shared Shinola’s + Sephora’s holiday campaigns + mood boards, and today I’m blogging about one brand that should be very familiar on this blog, Marimekko. Every year the folks at Marimekko select prints and color ways to spotlight during the holiday season. They aren’t always “Christmas” patterns, as some are existing patterns in new color ways for the season. I especially love Sanna Annukka’s Lamppupampula pattern (pictured above), how great are those colors? I also like Maija Louekari’s playful Kuusikossa pattern that is very holiday themed (christmas trees, see below in post). Another favorite is Sami Ruotsalainen’s Hauki pattern, with the fish. These patterns and products would look great in any home during the holidays, or throughout the year. Hope you enjoyed these Holiday-themed posts and get into the wonderful world of Marimekko below.

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Sanna Annukka’s Lamppupampula Pattern, pictured above.

Maija Louekari’s Kuusikossa Pattern, below.

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Sami Ruotsalainen’s Hauki Pattern, pictured below.

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I love these fish! How great are these?

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Today while browsing Pinterest I stumbled across the Leta Sobierajski x Print All Over Me collection and stopped in my tracks. I haven’t blogged about patterns/prints too much lately, so consider this post a return to form. I seriously can’t get enough of these images. Great patterns, fun colors + poses … what a fun project! Leta Sobierajski is a multidisciplinary freelance designer & art director in New York City. She combines mediums in design, photography, art, and styling to develop tangible compositions for print, digital, and motion. In 2014, she was recognized as a top 20 under 30 designer in Print Magazine’s New Visual Artists issue. I’m also super-into the typeface she designed, Marle, which can be purchased exclusively at Ten Dollar Fronts. It’s so great to see graphic designers experimenting with patterns. This project definitely inspires me to step up my game and get back into creating patterns of my own. But until then, get into more of Leta’s collection for Print All Over Me below.

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How great are these? If you want to check out more of Leta Sobierajski’s work, check out her site, her collection for Print All Over Me, or follow her on social media. Get into it!

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Made-a-Mano-Backsplash-in-Blue-Remodelista

Today after a lovely brunch in Brooklyn, I stumbled across Remodelista’s beautiful patchwork patterned tiles post, and I couldn’t wait to share the images here (and add a few of my personal favorites from Pinterest). I’ve been super into the idea of pattern mixing with tile in kitchens, bathrooms, on floors, etc for a while now. God willing, if I’m ever call myself a homeowner here in NYC, I’d love to create moments like this in my apartment. It is also a dream of mine to design my own patterns/tiles like this, and mix them in this patchwork style. A DREAM I tell you! So until then, get into this patchwork pattern inspiration. And happy MLK day!

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Made a Mano
patchwork tiles (above and below). I love the way these tiles look mixed together. Graphic and beautiful.

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Blue and white tiles from Odyssey’s Blue Tapestry Collection (above). Love the two applications of patterned tiles for floors (below).

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And now time for two of my favorites, patchwork tiles by Sonya Marish for Jatana Interiors (below). Obsessed!

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Don’t these tiles look great with bold colored furniture? Also loving the contrast between the graphic tiles and raw concrete floors/brick walls. Would move into this place in a second. For more images like this, check out my Pattern board on Pinterest. Get into it!

 

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Graphic Thought Facility (London, above)

While searching for pattern inspiration today on Pinterest, I stumbled across a cool blog post on Maharam’s website about a collection of patterns by a group of graphic designers. I (shockingly) had never heard of Maharam before, and I’m so happy I found them! Maharam was founded in 1902. From small beginnings, Maharam transformed from a source of theatrical textiles for costume and set design in the 1940s to a pioneer of performance-driven textiles for commercial interiors in the ’60s. Today Maharam partners with designers from all disciplines creating conceptual, performance and fashion textiles for countless companies.

In the post Maharam writes,

Patterns are the double helix of the textile industry—the visual DNA that serves to establish the identity of a company. In the pre-digital era, companies like Pucci and Marimekko found a way to create and make distinct visual vocabularies their own. As Maharam moved into the digitized world of the 21st century, we challenged ourselves with a design research initiative that could capture emerging post-analog trends and yield a new pattern language that we could call our own. 

In collaboration with Pentagram’s Abbott Miller, Maharam invited an international group of ten entities at the forefront of graphic design to create ten patterns each. The participants included A4 Studio (New York), Marian Bantjes (Canada), cyan (Berlin), Graphic Thought Facility (London), Harmen Liemburg (Amsterdam), Karel Martens (Arnhem), Abbott Miller (New York), Niessen & de Vries (Amsterdam), Post Typography (Baltimore), and Casey Reas (Los Angeles).

As a trained graphic designer that also studied textile design, these two diciplines work so well together. I think all graphic designers should learn about textile and pattern design. The images below are some of my favorites from Maharam’s 1/10 Pattern Stories post. Tomorrow I’m going to share even more patterns and photos from Maharam’s NYC design studio. Get into it!

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Harmen Liemberg (above).

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Niessen & de Vries (above).

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cyan (above).

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Abbott Miller (above and below). This is pretty cool no? Flattening a car and making a graphic pattern. Love it.

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Harmen Liemburg (above).

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Niessen & de Vries (above).

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Louis Vuitton x Yayoi Kusama_Popup2

A few days ago, I blogged about W’s December 2013 Art Issue featuring George Clooney in a suit painted by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. W’s magazine cover inspired me to look more into her work and the 2012 Louis Vuitton x Yayoi Kusama collaboration, images of which I also shared in the previous post. Today I’m sharing some of the A-MAZING in-store experiences Louis Vuitton created around the world in cities like Paris, London and New York. It’s neat seeing Kusama’s work come to life in an retail experience. Each of these pop-up shops are practically works of art themselves. As a windows and in-store experience designer, and someone into textile and pattern design, Kusama’s work is the perfect marriage of the two. So check out these interiors and beautiful store windows below. Embrace the polka dot. Love the polka dot!

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And now for the store windows (below).

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Josef Frank “Manhattan” textile on Linen (above).

Today I bring you my third (and final) post in a series about Scandinavian textile designer Josef Frank. Originally I’d intended to release these posts back to back (to back) but work got a little crazy, so better late than never! As my other posts focused on nature/plants and bird motifs, this post contains some of Frank’s more unique patterns. “Manhattan” is one of my favorite Frank patterns, partly because I live in NYC, but also because how graphic it is. The way it repeats is also pretty inventive. From 1942-1946, Josef Frank lived and worked as a visiting professor at the New School for Social Research in New York. Frank found Manhattan’s city plan so interesting in its brutal simplicity that he created the Manhattan design which includes a map of the island. Frank designed similar patterns in this style for Stockholm, both of its city grid and another depicting its architecture. I hope you enjoy this final look (at least for now) of one of my favorite textile designers, Josef Frank. If you see anything you like, check out Svenskt Tenn‘s website, or Just Scandinavian here in NYC to see Frank’s work in person.

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Frank’s “Manhattan” textile in person at Svenskt Tenn in Stockholm (above) from my study tour of Sweden. As you can see below, this pattern has been applied to several products at Svenkst Tenn including coasters, laminated wooden trays and pillows. I have one of the small trays, but would love the Manhattan print on just about anything.

Joes Frank Svenskt Tenn Manhattan Birch Tray Josef Frank Svenskt Tenn Manhattan Coasters Josef Frank Svenskt Tenn Manhattan pillow

Josef Frank_Textile Terrazzo PillowJosef Frank “Terrazzo” pillow (above).

According to Svenskt Tenn’s website, of Frank 160+ patterns, only two varied from nature motifs, “Terrazzo” is one of such prints (below). This print was sent to Estrid Ericson as a gift on her 50th birthday in 1944.

Josef Frank_Textile Terrazzo 315 Linen

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I was lucky enough to see “Terrazzo” in person during my visit to Svenkst Tenn in 2011. This pattern also comes on everything from pillows to plates (below).

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Close up view of a Frank textile at Svenskt Tenn in Stockholm, Sweden (above).

Continuing in my week of posts devoted to Scandinavian textile designer Josef Frank, today I bring you a new series of patterns. While compiling patterns to share from Svenskt Tenn‘s website (a great resource for all things Frank, and beautiful interiors) I noticed many of Frank’s patterns depict scenes with animals. I enjoy Frank’s creative approach to drawing animals, and especially birds. It’s clear nature played a huge role as inspiration for the designer. Interestingly enough, in this post I’m sharing both the FIRST and LAST patterns Frank ever created (with an artistic output of 170 patterns, these two patterns are then quite special). Hope you enjoy Day 2 of Josef Frank (check out Day 1 if you haven’t already), and of course, get into it!

Josef Frank_Textile Anakreon 315 Linen

  “Anakreon” textile by Josef Frank on Cotton. Anakreon was the first pattern that Josef Frank designed for Svenskt Tenn. The pattern, completed in 1938, originates from a 3,500 year-old fresco from the palace in Knossos on Crete. It is named after Anacreon, the Greek poet from 500 B.C. who was famous for his songs about love and drinking. Available in two colorways (above and below).

Josef Frank_Textile Anakreon Black Linen

Josef Frank_Textile Gröna Fåglar 315 Linen

“Gröna Fåglar” (or Green Birds) textile by Josef Frank on Cotton (above). A Frank classic.

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“Italian Dinner” textile by Josef Frank on Linen (above).

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“Butterfly” textile by Josef Frank on Linen (above).

Josef Frank_Textile Himalaya 315 Linen

“Himalaya” textile by Josef Frank on Linen (above). Josef Frank designed this pattern, which would be his last, in 1950. Looking back on his life‘s work, he summed it up in a culmination which he named Himalaya. In the pattern, a paradise on earth is drawn against the backdrop of rounded mountains in dramatic colours; the bounty of autumn and the pleasure of spring.

Sad this was his last pattern, but how lucky are we that his legacy endures and is thriving after all these years?

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