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Posts Tagged ‘NYC’

& Other Stories_SoHo_NYC_5Several months ago I heard that “& Other Stories” (along with COS!) are opening in NYC’s Soho neighborhood, as part of H&M’s mission to take over NYC. I’ve followed & Other Stories on tumblr for a while now, not realizing they were soon opening here. A few days ago I heard they installed a new hoarding barricade to create anticipation for their new store opening. Yesterday I decided to take a long walk home just so I could pass by in person. On the barricade are dozens of hand-painted colored tiles. Such a simple idea turned into an beautiful art instillation. As someone working in retail store design, I think this is a really great idea. Take a look below a some of the process images & Other Posted, and if you’re in NYC check out this beauty before the store opens soon. Get into it!

& Other Stories_SoHo_NYC_3 & Other Stories_SoHo_NYC_4Awesome colors right? See the process below!

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Solution 45 - Julio Alan Lepez

Solution 45
2011, collage, oil on mdf
12.2 x 12.2 inches

Tonight I’m heading to the Artemisa Gallery for their inaugural exhibition, Experiencing Contemporary Latin American Art, here in NYC. I’m excited to see work by one of my new favorite artists, Julio Alan Lepez on display in a gallery. In September, I blogged about Lepez’s work, and now I’ve been invited to a show featuring him. How cool is that? If you’re in the NYC area, check out the Artemisa Gallery and their new exhibition, Experiencing Contemporary Latin American Art, on display until March 3rd!

online invitation ARTEMISA opening copy

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162 Stanton

Windows of New York is a project by NYC-based graphic designer José Guizar. Each week Jose draws different windows he sees during his travels around NYC. You’re probably thinking, windows? Why would anyone be inspired by windows? As someone also living in NYC, I can attest to the large variety in architecture that appears throughout the city. This is such a simple idea and José illustrates his area of exploration so well. This project really speaks to his skill as an illustrator! So take a trip through NYC with José and his Windows of New York. See the entire project here.

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290 Lafayette

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461 W. 47th

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617 9th

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199 E. 4th

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962 Lexington

See them all here – Windows of NY.

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The website for my Pratt MFA Thesis project is finally up and stable! I say stable because I’ve been talking to NameSecure since last week trying to work an IP forwarding issue, but *knock on wood* the site is up and working! I also launched the Twitter account (@thisbringsmejoy) where I’m going to post the individual joy statements and some of the postcards too. I’m hoping this will be a way to engage the public and excite participation with people I don’t know.

Yesterday I mailed back around 40 postcards to their “owners,” as I’m calling them. Each postcard in my exhibition, and on the website, correspond to a specific letter, or a joy statement that repeated again and again (such as champagne, sex, sailing, the sun, etc .. ). I have several extras and I want to mail them to a few people so they can send them to others and help the project grow. Maybe they can each send postcards to 2-3 people they think should participate. Then I’ll design more responses, and make more postcards, which will be mailed … and the project will continue to grow!

I’ve bought so many stamps this semester ..

It makes me sad I won’t have a complete set of front and back postcards anymore, but that’s part of letting go I think. I can either have a project that’s pretty to look and enjoy it myself, or I can release it into the world, and let it live. This also created motivation for me to figure out how to reproduce these cards at a reasonable price. In other exciting news, my friend Nick is participating in this years Barnes & Noble Back to Campus program, which I worked on last year, and he sent me a first look at my sketchbook, which will be in all B&N stores this July/August.

The cover is both embossed and debossed so you can feel the texture of the painted cover. I still haven’t seen the physical thing, but from the picture I’m excited. He said it was displayed on their table with the projects they’re most excited about, SOOO I’m hoping that means it’ll become an “evergreen” item, which means they’ll order higher quantities and it might stay in stores more seasons (which means more money for me!) I may be abroad when these hit stores, so i hope someone can grab me a sketchbook or pencil pouch.

Also this week I visited to the new section of the HighLine park in NYC. The new part opened last week, and it may be more amazing than the first, if that’s even possible. The new section has all these nooks and benches to sit on off the path, that are pretty neat. I’d suggest visiting during a workday, especially in the morning, because the place gets pretty crowded. A week from Friday I’m heading to Copenhagen for 6 weeks to study textile design, I’m sooooo excited. I found a subleaser for my apt, so that takes huge financial pressure off me upon my return in August. I’ll be studying textile design just like Stephanie did last summer, check out her blog here. I’m hoping to spend next week reading her blog and researching textiles and Copenhagen so I can be prepared for my trip abroad. Lots of exciting things coming up.

There were lot so these yellow flowers, cool looking right?

cool dark purple leaves

The trees in the new section are taller, almost like walking through urban woods

I liked this seating area, reminds me of Downtown Durham, NC and the tobacco warehouses

Really awesome futuristic building right on HighLine overlooking the new lawn

One of the seating nooks, when the trees fill in, these will be nice shady areas

In this section, they expose the support beams that hold the structure two stories above the street.

In this picture you can see the new HighLine (foreground), and the remaining original part (background), an physical before and after.
I sort of hope they leave a bit of the original HighLine untouched and natural. It’s cool to see.

 

 

 

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St. Vincent’s Hospital “Place Project” — Full View

Here are screen shots of my finals projects after my first semester in Pratt’s MFA program. This year I was in three studios, Graduate Seminar, and Thesis (17 hours — before this point, I had never taken more than 9). While some classes I really enjoyed (Visual Language and Transformation Design), one in particular I felt absolutely no connection with (Technology Studio). Despite my lack of enthusiasm for Technology Studio, I’m really happy with my final project, “Romantically Uninvolved: 2010 Annual Report” — an annual report on my “dating life” (of lack there of) during 2010. Once everything is posted and presented, I will spend more time talking about each project. So enjoy the pictures, they’re probably better than whatever BS MFA artist statements I’ll come up with later 😉

Close-up of St. Vincent’s Poster, 26×42 Poster, Visual Language Studio

A peak into my “Creative Process”(a mess). 30×30 Poster, Transformation Design Studio

Close-up of “Process” Poster, “Let your haters be your motivators”

Cover of “Romantically Uninvolved: 2010 Annual Report” 20-page Report, Technology Studio

Interior Spread

Close-up of NYC Map in Annual Report.

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I introduced this project in a previous post about new MFA work at Pratt. For the last week or so, I’ve been reading, visiting, and exploring what is left of St. Vincent’s Hospital in NYC. As someone that has only lived in New York for a year and a half, I honestly don’t feel very connected to many places in the city. Yet again, we are asked to pick a place of significance in New York as an inspiration for a self-initiated project. I actually like doing this, don’t get me wrong, I just wish I lived here longer, so I’d know more about the places I’m investigating. I’d recently read an article in NY Magazine about St. Vincent’s closing and NYC’s (in my view) fucked health care system. My only knowledge about the hospital was that it was the center of the AIDS crisis in the 1980s. It is literally around the corner from Pratt Manhattan, yet I didn’t hear about the actual closing until months later.

Thankfully, I don’t have much experience with hospitals. My brother had to go a few times due to head injuries, but besides that, I’m not used to visiting or staying in hospitals. I feel uncomfortable in them, but I think that’s normal. I do have a memory of one of my brother’s hospital trips: I didn’t want to go along b/c I’d miss Dawson’s Creek (priorities!) and I was making a pasta salad (it was in the freezer to get cold quicker). My brother ended up being fine, but I spent all night missing Dawson’s Creek, and my pasta salad was totally frozen.

What strikes me about St. Vincent’s is, how can a hospital fail? How can a hospital be aloud to go bankrupt? St. Vincent’s was nearly 160 years old, it treated patients from a cholera outbreak in the 1800’s, survivors of the Titanic, diagnosed the first cases of AIDS in the US, and survived 9-11. Yet it couldn’t save itself. Our country has a strange relationship with health care. Many wealthy nations view it as a human right, while in the US, health care is a booming profit-driven industry, based upon NOT providing care and help to those that need it. The idea of companies gaining profit on the ill-health of their customers is sickening to me, but that’s another issue.

So why St. Vincent’s … why do I feel a connection to a hospital I never visited? After reading the NY magazine article, I felt really sad. It made St. Vincent’s seem like a living thing. An aging, broken, and sad thing … but still something once living. This hospital in particular holds so much history, and if the towers are turned into condos, or if the buildings are torn down, what happens to all that history? Shouldn’t we (and by that I mean NYC) thank the hospital for all its done for the city? Our government will bail out auto makers, banks, wall street, give huge tax breaks to corporations, but why didn’t they save the hospital … a business dedicated to delivering and saving lives? There were a lot of problems with St. Vincent’s, and it didn’t happen over night, but I want to save the stories of the place, even if the hospital itself is beyond repair.

Here’s an example of what I mean, from the Save St. Vincent’s facebook page:

There is a digital memorial, or archive of this type for stories about 9-11. It’s called the September 11th Digital Archive. St. Vincent’s deserves the same. Something alive online, where previous patients, workers, politicians, etc can add stories and images, so that history will be preserved. That is what I propose for my final project. I’ve reached out to a few people, but I’d really like this project to be bigger than the class if I can talk to the right people.

Here are some photos I took last week exploring the site.

 

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