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Posts Tagged ‘dot patterns’

Josef Frank_textile_closeup

Close up view of a Frank textile at Svenskt Tenn in Stockholm, Sweden (above).

Continuing in my week of posts devoted to Scandinavian textile designer Josef Frank, today I bring you a new series of patterns. While compiling patterns to share from Svenskt Tenn‘s website (a great resource for all things Frank, and beautiful interiors) I noticed many of Frank’s patterns depict scenes with animals. I enjoy Frank’s creative approach to drawing animals, and especially birds. It’s clear nature played a huge role as inspiration for the designer. Interestingly enough, in this post I’m sharing both the FIRST and LAST patterns Frank ever created (with an artistic output of 170 patterns, these two patterns are then quite special). Hope you enjoy Day 2 of Josef Frank (check out Day 1 if you haven’t already), and of course, get into it!

Josef Frank_Textile Anakreon 315 Linen

  “Anakreon” textile by Josef Frank on Cotton. Anakreon was the first pattern that Josef Frank designed for Svenskt Tenn. The pattern, completed in 1938, originates from a 3,500 year-old fresco from the palace in Knossos on Crete. It is named after Anacreon, the Greek poet from 500 B.C. who was famous for his songs about love and drinking. Available in two colorways (above and below).

Josef Frank_Textile Anakreon Black Linen

Josef Frank_Textile Gröna Fåglar 315 Linen

“Gröna Fåglar” (or Green Birds) textile by Josef Frank on Cotton (above). A Frank classic.

Josef Frank_Textile Italian Dinner 315 Linen

“Italian Dinner” textile by Josef Frank on Linen (above).

Josef_Frank_Textile Butterfly 315 Linen

“Butterfly” textile by Josef Frank on Linen (above).

Josef Frank_Textile Himalaya 315 Linen

“Himalaya” textile by Josef Frank on Linen (above). Josef Frank designed this pattern, which would be his last, in 1950. Looking back on his life‘s work, he summed it up in a culmination which he named Himalaya. In the pattern, a paradise on earth is drawn against the backdrop of rounded mountains in dramatic colours; the bounty of autumn and the pleasure of spring.

Sad this was his last pattern, but how lucky are we that his legacy endures and is thriving after all these years?

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colettecolab2

I’ve had my eye on the Saturdays Surf NYC x Colette collaboration for a few weeks now as I’m pretty much obsessed with anything Saturdays Surf NYC. I stumbled across this pattern they’re using on shorts in their spring 2013 collection and I’m so in love. The print is simple and graphic, and works really well in multiple applications. I like that it appears hand painted too. Patterns like this are so simple to create and put into repeats. Once this is done you can apply them to anything: clothes, product design, packaging and digital applications too. I’ve been feeling the itch to get back to designing new prints and patterns so keep on the lookout.

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saturdays_surfnyc_colette_window1

Colette window in Paris displaying the Saturdays Surf NYC x Colette collabo

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Notice how the pattern is applied to bags and hats too, and how well they match with the shirts? Get into it!

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