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Archive for the ‘Textiles’ Category

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Marimekko’s spring/summer 2017 collection reintroduces five iconic garments from the 1960s and 1970s.

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Last week I stumbled across a post on Marimekko’s Instagram that stopped me in my tracks. The post (above), features a look from the spring/summer 2017 collection where Marimekko reintroduces iconic looks from the 1960s and 70s. I’ve been a huge fan of Marimekko since graduate school when I took a textile design course at the Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Marimekko, a design house founded in Finland in 1951, is known for their colorful and iconic pattern and textile designs. Today their prints not only adorn textiles and clothing, but also items for your home.

“Over the years, Marimekko has remained true to its original mission of bringing joy to everyday life. A positive and empowering lifestyle brand marrying creativity with function, Marimekko continues to delight the world with timeless, yet distinctive designs for fashion, accessories and home décor.”

I love the idea of heritage brands using their archives to create new collections. Gap recently did this with the Generation Gap collection from the 90’s. Brands today, especially fashion brands with rich histories, should make this a regular practice. Perhaps they keep the designs 100% the same, or they update vintage patterns and silhouettes to todays tastes. Whatever they decide, I can’t get enough!

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Marimekko is a brand that I have so much respect and admiration for, so I’m thrilled to share this special collection with you. As a brand they stand for quality, creativity, happiness and joy. You can sense this through the products they produce and when you step foot in their stores.

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Marimekko’s NYC Flagship (above).

Other bands take note! Search your archives, bring back special items for a new day, and share that sense of joy with the world.

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Today I’m sharing my last in a series of favorite Holiday brands from 2014. Earlier I shared Shinola’s + Sephora’s holiday campaigns + mood boards, and today I’m blogging about one brand that should be very familiar on this blog, Marimekko. Every year the folks at Marimekko select prints and color ways to spotlight during the holiday season. They aren’t always “Christmas” patterns, as some are existing patterns in new color ways for the season. I especially love Sanna Annukka’s Lamppupampula pattern (pictured above), how great are those colors? I also like Maija Louekari’s playful Kuusikossa pattern that is very holiday themed (christmas trees, see below in post). Another favorite is Sami Ruotsalainen’s Hauki pattern, with the fish. These patterns and products would look great in any home during the holidays, or throughout the year. Hope you enjoyed these Holiday-themed posts and get into the wonderful world of Marimekko below.

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Sanna Annukka’s Lamppupampula Pattern, pictured above.

Maija Louekari’s Kuusikossa Pattern, below.

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Sami Ruotsalainen’s Hauki Pattern, pictured below.

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I love these fish! How great are these?

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Recently I stumbled across the a-mazing collaboration between Scandinavian streetwear brand Wood Wood, and Disney. This capsulate collection was first released at Colette in Paris, then online in Europe. I was immediately drawn to the abstracted patterns and prints designer Brian SS Jensen created of Disney’s Mickey Mouse. How inventive and creative! It’s frankly surprising a mega-brand like Disney would license their creative in this way. So forward thinking and cool of them. I can’t get enough of this entire collection. What do you guys think?

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Today while browsing Pinterest I stumbled across the Leta Sobierajski x Print All Over Me collection and stopped in my tracks. I haven’t blogged about patterns/prints too much lately, so consider this post a return to form. I seriously can’t get enough of these images. Great patterns, fun colors + poses … what a fun project! Leta Sobierajski is a multidisciplinary freelance designer & art director in New York City. She combines mediums in design, photography, art, and styling to develop tangible compositions for print, digital, and motion. In 2014, she was recognized as a top 20 under 30 designer in Print Magazine’s New Visual Artists issue. I’m also super-into the typeface she designed, Marle, which can be purchased exclusively at Ten Dollar Fronts. It’s so great to see graphic designers experimenting with patterns. This project definitely inspires me to step up my game and get back into creating patterns of my own. But until then, get into more of Leta’s collection for Print All Over Me below.

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How great are these? If you want to check out more of Leta Sobierajski’s work, check out her site, her collection for Print All Over Me, or follow her on social media. Get into it!

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Two days ago I blogged about Hudson’s Bay Company’s iconic point blanket and some of its creative applications in homes/interiors and use in the fashion world. After more digging, I’ve found even more examples of collaborations between Hudson’s Bay and other companies, notably Converse and Timex. It’s cool to see how this simple pattern can be so easily applied to shoes, coats, bags and watches. The possibilities are endless! Get into it.

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Another interior (above) with the patterned blankets. The Hudson’s Bay Co x Converse collection (below).

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One textile pattern I’ve been following recently is the iconic Hudson’s Bay point blanket. HBCo’s is one of (if not the) oldest department store in North American dating back to the 1800’s. The point blankets (pictured above) were first sold in Canada in the 18th century to Native Americans in exchange for beaver pelts. These wool blankets were prized for their ability to stay warm even when wet. Two hundred years later these iconic blankets are part of North American history (and here I thought they were just a new pattern). Pendleton Woolen Mills also makes a similar blanket called the Glacier National Park Blanket which were first sold in the early 1900s. According to their website,

“Since the early 1900s, Pendleton Woolen Mills has honored America’s National Parks with a collection of distinctive park blankets. Glacier Park National Park Blanket was one of the first. Its historic markings and colors date back to the frontier trading posts. Traders would indicate the weight of the blanket offered in exchange for furs by holding up one finger for each pound. The original blankets incorporated three, four or five black stripes in the design, which indicated the value of the blanket. Colors and variations of the original striped theme have been adapted to reflect distinguishing characteristics of each park and blanket in the collection. (link). 

HBCo has a heritage site on the Point Blanket dating back to 1780 here if you’d like to read more. Super interesting!

I’m not exactly sure the difference between the two blankets, but safe to say both have a rich history and are still relevant today, in fashion and interiors. I love how a pattern so simple and graphic can reach iconic status. Just like Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama and her polka dots, this pattern with it’s green, red, yellow and indigo stripes is so uniquely its own. Need to get one of my own ASAP.

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I love some of the more unique applications of the stripes (below).

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I also like this graphic pattern so easily translated into fashion (below).

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Graphic Thought Facility (London, above)

While searching for pattern inspiration today on Pinterest, I stumbled across a cool blog post on Maharam’s website about a collection of patterns by a group of graphic designers. I (shockingly) had never heard of Maharam before, and I’m so happy I found them! Maharam was founded in 1902. From small beginnings, Maharam transformed from a source of theatrical textiles for costume and set design in the 1940s to a pioneer of performance-driven textiles for commercial interiors in the ’60s. Today Maharam partners with designers from all disciplines creating conceptual, performance and fashion textiles for countless companies.

In the post Maharam writes,

Patterns are the double helix of the textile industry—the visual DNA that serves to establish the identity of a company. In the pre-digital era, companies like Pucci and Marimekko found a way to create and make distinct visual vocabularies their own. As Maharam moved into the digitized world of the 21st century, we challenged ourselves with a design research initiative that could capture emerging post-analog trends and yield a new pattern language that we could call our own. 

In collaboration with Pentagram’s Abbott Miller, Maharam invited an international group of ten entities at the forefront of graphic design to create ten patterns each. The participants included A4 Studio (New York), Marian Bantjes (Canada), cyan (Berlin), Graphic Thought Facility (London), Harmen Liemburg (Amsterdam), Karel Martens (Arnhem), Abbott Miller (New York), Niessen & de Vries (Amsterdam), Post Typography (Baltimore), and Casey Reas (Los Angeles).

As a trained graphic designer that also studied textile design, these two diciplines work so well together. I think all graphic designers should learn about textile and pattern design. The images below are some of my favorites from Maharam’s 1/10 Pattern Stories post. Tomorrow I’m going to share even more patterns and photos from Maharam’s NYC design studio. Get into it!

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Harmen Liemberg (above).

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Niessen & de Vries (above).

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cyan (above).

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Abbott Miller (above and below). This is pretty cool no? Flattening a car and making a graphic pattern. Love it.

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Harmen Liemburg (above).

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Niessen & de Vries (above).

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